Animal January 25, 2017

Mammals

Porcupines

Porcupine

While out on a Midnight Mushing run August 5, 2016 the WooFDriver captured these Porcupines. Porcupines are mammals who know how to protect themselves, with a coat covered in sharp quills for any predator that dares to harass them! Did you know they are the third largest rodent? They only ones bigger are the Capybara and the Beaver.

Wikipedia’s Webpage  to learn more about these nocturnal creatures!

See the video below!!

Also enjoy the photos!!
Porcupines


Cottontail Rabbit

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On June 4, 2016, while out Mushing the WooFPAK on the Lower Trail, the WooFDriver spotted this Cottontail Rabbit hanging out with a bird on the trail! The average life expectancy for the Cottontail Rabbit is only 2 years, this is because almost every carnivore that is larger or quicker is their potential predator. Even squirrels with hunt them if they show signs of illness!!

Wikipedia’s Webpage to learn more


Long Tailed Weasel

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On June 10, 2016, while out Midnight Mushing on the C&O Canal Towpath in the area of Antietam, the WooFDriver and his crew made a rare sighting of a Long Tailed Weasel! They are small mammals but measuring from 11 to 17 inches long, they are actually the largest of the weasel family. You can find the Long Tailed Weasel throughout most of the United States living in various habitats from marshland, woodlands, open prairies to rocky outcrops.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources Website to learn more!

Enjoy the video from the sighting!


Eastern Grey Squirrel

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While watching for wildlife WooFDriver captured this Eastern Grey Squirrel(Sciurus Carolinensis)! They are a tree squirrel that are native to Eastern North America but have been introduced to Europe over the years. They are one of a few mammals that can descend a tree head first. This is due to their hind paws having claws that point backwards for better grip. To protect their food supply, if they feel like they are being watched they will pretend to hide their food and take it elsewhere.

Wikipedia Webpage to learn more about this squirrel

Enjoy these photos the WooFDriver was able to capture!
Grey Squirrel


Red Squirrel

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On December 27, 2015 the WooFDriver took the WooFPAK to the Greenbrier River Trail in West Virginia to do a Mushing adventure. On the trail they came across what appears to be a Red Squirrel(Tamiasciurus hudsonicus)! Red Squirrels live in a wide range of forest area across North America, hardwood forests to the east and pine forests to the west and north. They eat a wide variety of foods including spruce cones, seeds, berries, buds, mushrooms and sometimes even insects and bird eggs.

Alaska’s Department of Fish and Game Website to learn more about this squirrel


Sheep

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While traveling to Spruce Mountain West Virginia for a Mushing Tour, the WooFDriver captured these peaceful Sheep(Ovis aries) grazing in the valley. Sheep are flock animals, it is natural for them to follow the dominate sheep to new pastures. Flock behavior however is only exhibited with groups of four or more sheep and in regions where they have natural predators.

Wikipedia’s Webpage to learn more about Sheep

Please enjoy this photo album of Sheep the WooFDriver has captured throughout his adventures!
Sheep


Opossum

Possum-10.04.2013

On a Midnight Mushing tour with the WooFDriver, the WooFPAK caught the scent of this Opossum! They are famous for “playing possum” when threatened by dogs, foxes, and other predators. This one however felt it was at a safe enough distance being up in the tree! They are excellent tree climbers and nest in tree holes or dens made by other animals.

National Geographic Website to learn more about Opossums

Enjoy this photo album from an Opossum encounter the WooFPAK had on Spruce Mountain in West Virginia on November 15, 2015!
Opossum


American Black Bear

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The WooFPAK was first to alert on this sighting! While mushing WooFDriver noticed the PAK acting up and knew they were heading for something unusual ahead. This gorgeous and thankfully shy Black Bear(Ursus americanus)!!

The Black Bear is the smallest of the three bear species found in North America and they are only in North America. Their short, non-retractable claws give them their excellent tree climbing skills.

Defenders Website to learn more about Black Bears

 


Coyote

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coyotetextWhile on a mushing tour with the WooFPAK, WooFDriver was able to get a glimpse of a beautiful Coyote! Coyotes are a relatively new addition to local ecosystems here in the east coast and first documented in Maryland in 1972. Average weight is approximately 30 to 40 pounds, with some individuals approaching close to 60 pounds.

Maryland’s Department of Natural Resources Website to learn more about Coyotes in Maryland


Raccoon

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This is a picture of a Raccoon sleeping. One of the WooFDriver’s crew members rescued and released back into the wild.

Raccoons live deciduous and mixed forests, but are very adaptable extending their range to mountainous areas, coastal marshes and urban areas. In urban areas they often get into trouble by vehicles, making dens in attics and confrontations with domesticated pets.

Wikipedia’s Webpage to learn more about Raccoons


Beaver(Evidence)

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The WooFDriver has seen much evidence of beaver activity while taking the WooFPAK on rail trail mushing tours. Looks like they are in the process of making a dam. Beavers also fall smaller trees for food. ‘Beaver fever’ is a term that coined by the press after finding the parasite Giardia lamblia that is carried by beavers. They then pollute the waterways infecting animals that drink the water downstream. Dogs and humans alike can get this parasite and need to be careful and purify the water they drink.

Wikipedia’s Webpage to learn more about Beavers

Enjoy this album from the WooFDriver’s sightings!
Evidence of Beavers


Mules

zarro--the-mules

While Free Ranging running the WooFPAK on May 5, 2013. Zarro thought he would make some new friends with these Mules! I was interested to learn that a Mule is an offspring of a male donkey and a female horse. They are thought to be more patient and hardier than horses and also less stubborn, faster and smarter than donkeys.

Wikipedia’s Webpage to learn more about Mules

Here is a photo album of the WooFPAK with their Mule friends!
Mules


Horses

Horse

May 17, 2014 the WooFDriver took the WooFPAK to the horse track! Yes, the PAK was running the track while the horses got to watch! A horse’s anatomy enables it to make us of speed to escape predators, but they were not scare of these WooFs. Horses(Equus ferus caballus) have the largest eyes of any land mammal and have a great sense of balance.

Wikipedia’s Webpage to learn more about horses

Please enjoy this photo album of the horses the WooFDriver has captured while out on his many adventures with the WooFPAK!
Horses


Groundhog

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On September 5, 2014 the WooFDriver took the WooFPAK for a Free Ranging run in the Shenandoah Valley. Here they got on the scent of this little groundhog. Luckily for him groundhogs are very capable tree climbers! Did you know that groundhogs are on of the few species that enter a true hibernation? In most areas they hibernate from October until March or even April! That’s a long slumber!! In warmer climates they may only hibernate as little as three months though. Still a hearty nap! Read More About the Groundhog


Whitetail Deer

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Beautiful Deer are frequently part of our WooFDriver Activities. We see them all over and it is really cool especially when they are together with their offspring known as Fawn. I have trained the WooFPAK not to chase the Deer. They oblige with this rule nicely. On this sighting we were in the Shenandoah region summer of 2004!! Read more about Deer here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deer

Please enjoy this photo album of the beautiful Whitetail Deer The WooFDriver and his crew were able to capture on their many adventures!
Whitetail Deer

Here are videos from some of the deer sightings WooFDriver has seen on his adventures!


Canine And Cattle

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Our Latest 2011 Summer Adventures find us at the “Big Farm”. This is a 400 Acre+ working Dairy Farm with beautiful Clydesdale Horses, Huge cornfields, a maze of FREE Ranging Trails, and an awesome Pond. I have been fortunate enough to rent the use of the “Big Farm” to FREE Range the WooFPak!! I use the Polaris Electric ATV and Roll with dogs all over this place!! My Tail of this Trail is the mix of my PAK with the Dairy cows and The Bull!! I was certainly apprehensive about the first meeting. Again my dogs are trained and very responsive to my commands but I was not sure how the cows were going to receive us!! Obviously the cows are contained in their pasture, but I certainly didn’t want to scare them. Well it was an excellent experience for all of us!! The dogs were of course very much interested in the cows and the cows were also quite interested in the dogs!! The Bull of course stared us down and stood his ground. Now, when we FREE Range at The “Big Farm” the cows and dogs are comfortable with each other and in fact the cows have started to come right over to us and seem to be “mooing” at us!! This is so cool and a great nature experience!!

Cute, Curious, and Cool – Canines & Cows 9.21.2012


On our Farm Run today we saw a bunch of cows!! We are lucky and get to see them frequently at this particular farm (I call The Big Farm because it is over 400 acres). The Cows are always very curious about the WooFPAK (my dogs) and the dogs are likewise curious about them. If we approach gently the cows will come to the fence and check us out. My one Dog Jag is a real ham and the only one in my WooFPAK that will actually go right up to the fence and maybe have a “Cow Kiss”!! He is a little unsure of the situation as you see in the video but he gets more confident and comfortable with time. The other dogs look on with their own curiosity!!

WooFDriver takes the WooFPAK to many rural places where they get to encounter many Cows as seen in this album!
Canine and Cattle

About the author

Andrea Edwards: